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Monaco – We Arrange all You Need to Reside in Monaco – Rent or Buy a Property

Monaco ProgramAn idyllic tax haven with Mediterranean flair, the magnificent royal seat of the Grimaldi family and harbours full of luxury yachts – Monaco is a byword for the glamorous lifestyles of celebrities and millionaires.

With an area of just 2.03 km2, the Principality of Monaco – which is located on the Côte d’Azur – is the second-smallest independent country in the world (only the Vatican City is smaller). With around 18,000 inhabitants per square kilometre, this prosperous city state is also the most densely populated.

Of the almost 37,000 inhabitants – who come from more than 100 countries – 78 per cent do not own a Monaco passport. French (28%) and Italians (19%) are by far the largest groups, while Germans account for around three per cent of the overall population (approx. 900 people). Monaco is highly sought-after as a place of residence by affluent individuals from all over the world, since the laws of this elegant city state – which is not a member of the EU – do not require the collection of inheritance or income tax.

Accordingly, Monaco does not inflict penalties for tax offences committed abroad; however, it does require taxes to be paid by businesses.
While Monaco is bordered on all sides (except its coastline) by France, it is also only around 12 kilometres from the Italian border. The nearest big city is Nice (21 km), the capital of the French Riviera.

The official language of Monaco is French, though the Monegasque dialect – which is similar to Italian – is also spoken by some. Due to the multicultural nature of this small country, Italian and English are ubiquitous.

How Safe Is Monaco?

Monaco is one of the safest countries on Earth. As well as boasting extremely high numbers of police relative to its population (more than 500 policemen and women in total), it also has an extremely low crime rate.

Public spaces and buildings in all parts of the principality are monitored by police-controlled video cameras, while numerous private surveillance cameras and security services also play their part in the excellent crime statistics. On the flip side of this, Monaco has a well-known reputation as a surveillance state.

Monaco’s police force is divided into several sections: the criminal department (which cooperates with Interpol), the uniformed city police, the air and sea department and the administration team.

Although this city state’s excellent security is largely a result of its proximity to France, Monaco also has a 130-strong military corps. However, its members mainly undertake duties related to fire defence and civil security.

A further paramilitary unit takes care of the princely family’s protection and the palace guard. The company, which consists of approximately 120 soldiers, is also responsible for diplomatic protocols when state visitors are received.

Monaco‘s Monetary and Tax Policy

Refined and luxurious – thanks to the wealthy foreigners who live here, Monaco has long been a symbol of affluence and elegance. This is primarily due to the fact that private individuals are not required to pay income tax, an exemption that has existed since 1869.

Corporate tax, customs duties and fees – whether for registrations, insurance contracts or government levies on alcohol – account for a large share of Monaco’s income.

Monaco – whose official currency is the euro – does not have its own central bank. Thanks to an agreement with France, financial institutions located in Monaco are also subject to French laws. The number of Monegasque euro coins – which are inscribed with the word “Monaco” – is also derived from the share of French coins.

Thanks to a further agreement with France, the Principality of Monaco is also a part of the European Union customs area, though it is not a member of the EU. Accordingly, French customs provisions apply for the import and export of goods.

Public Finances in Monaco

In 2013, total government income and spending stood at around 945 million euros and 664 million euros respectively.

In 2013, Monaco’s gross domestic product was 4.94 billion euros. Government spending on education amounted to 4.4. per cent of GDP in 2004, while spending on health amounted to 4.5 per cent in 2006.

Currently Ongoing Construction Projects

Monaco ResidenceMonaco is often referred to as the “Manhattan of the Mediterranean” on account of its numerous modern high-rise buildings. The already-high population density and continuing trend for migration to this tiny state mean that Monaco is subject to ongoing real estate development. At times, this has been associated with significant noise pollution issues and other inconveniences for the Monegasque royal family. Wherever possible, free land is used to build extra accommodation.

The city district of Fontvieille, which is constructed almost entirely on artificially reclaimed land, was completed in 1981. A further six-hectare reclaimed district is planned for completion by 2024. The railway was located underground to leave extra land free for the construction of more high-rise buildings.

A floating pier – which was transported to Monaco from Spain by sea – is located in the harbour of La Condamine.  This more than 350 metre-long concrete structure provides a landing stage for large cruise ships and functions as a wave-breaker, an underground car park and a depot.

The prices for Monegasque apartments and penthouses are among the highest in the world. On average, at the end of 2010, buyers were paying more than 46,000 euros per square metre of living space. In the “celebrity quarter” of Monte Carlo, the price per square metre is almost double as high again.

The prominent and wealthy Pastor family exercises influence over many areas of public life in Monaco, and is also very powerful within the construction and real estate sectors.

Monaco’s Cultural Treasures

Monaco has a breathtakingly diverse range of cultural sights and sounds to offer, including the Opéra de Monaco, which was designed by renowned architect Charles Garnier and is located in the centre of the principality. The magnificent New Mannerist building was inaugurated in 1879 and has played host to countless unforgettable performances over the years.

Led by respected oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the well-recognised Oceanographic Museum also functions as an institute for thalassotherapy. And it’s not just the museum that is worth a visit – the surrounding grounds, which feature a number of beautiful exotic plants, are a must on any visitor’s list.

The outstanding philharmonic orchestra has been enchanting audiences with first-class concerts for more than 150 years. A visit to the Monaco Dance Academy, a working dance school, is also not to be missed.

Monaco regularly plays host to internationally acclaimed festivals. In addition, prizes are awarded annually to artistic professionals from a range of disciplines, including literature, music and modern art.

Sport in Monaco

Motorsports are very popular with inhabitants of the principality: the first Monaco Grand Prix was held here in 1929, and a Formula 1 race has taken place every year since 1955. The Rallye Monte Carlo, most of which takes place in rural French backcountry, also passes through part of Monaco.

The football club AS Monaco is among the most successful clubs in the French Ligue 1. Home games are played in the Stade Louis II. Since the Monegasque national football team is not a member of FIFA or UEFA, it does not take part in qualifying matches for the World or European Cups.

Each year in spring, tennis fans eagerly await the Monte Carlo Masters, an important men’s tournament that takes place on sand.

The Marathon de Monaco et des Riviera, which is held in November, has been attracting large numbers of runners to the Mediterranean Coast since 1995.

A further sporting highlight is the annual European Poker Tour Monte Carlo, which has been held in Monaco since 2005.

What to See in Monaco

Monaco ProgramThe Place du Casino is a definite must-see in the centre of Monaco. It is home to the architecturally spectacular Hôtel de Paris, the impressive Casino de Monte-Carlo and the opulent opera house. Since the Place du Casino is also a docking point for cruise liners, many visitors to Monaco arrive directly to here. On summer weekends in particular, crowds of visitors from all nations can be found disembarking from the ships.

Equally as impressive is the beautiful and historic old town of Monaco, Monaco-Ville, which is home to the magnificent Prince’s palace. A few areas of the stately residence are sometimes open to visitors as a museum. However, the residence of the noble family isn’t the only attraction – in the narrow streets, you’ll find countless attractive cafes, restaurants and souvenir shops to enjoy.

Perched on a cliff, the architecturally stunning Oceanographic Museum offers fascinating insights into the underwater world. The colourful aquariums contain more than 4,000 different types of fish and 200 different families of invertebrates.

Although Monaco is located mostly atop cliffs, it has one small public shingle beach. In the warmer months of the year, the cool water attracts holidaymakers and residents in equal measure, which means that the beach can often get crowded. It is sometimes not possible to swim there due to large numbers of jellyfish.

In addition to a diverse range of regional species, the Jardin Exotique – an idyllic botanical garden –features beautiful trees and fragrant flowers from South America, Africa and the Near East. What’s more, the garden’s unique location – which is near the border with France – affords unparalleled views of the whole principality.

As a restorative balance to the numerous high-rise buildings, Monaco also has a number of beautiful parks. These include the Japanese Garden, which delights visitors with its ornate Asian bridges and gorgeous Koi carp.

Whether haute couture and high-end boutiques or one-of-a-kind delicatessens and sensual fragrances – Monaco is a world-class destination for glamorous shoppers everywhere.

Tourists can experience no-expenses-spared luxury in Monaco’s three yacht harbours: the stunning sailing boats are anchored here ready for their well-to-do owners’ private excursions on the Mediterranean.

Residence Permits for EU Citizens

Monaco ProgramAny natural individual who is at least 16 years of age and wishes to reside in Monaco for more than three months per year must apply for a residence permit from the Monegasque authorities.

Residence permits cannot be issued to minors under the age of 16 unless the application is made in connection with a family application.

Once the application for the residence permit has been submitted and approved, an initial residence card may be issued. This is valid for a period of one year.

Conditions for Residence in Monaco

The requirements for foreign nationals setting up home in the principality vary according to the land of origin. In all cases, the following requirements must be fulfilled:

Accommodation in Monaco that is big enough to accommodate the persons living there. The applicant must be:

  • Owner of a house or apartment, or
  • Director or owner of a company that owns a house or apartment, or
  • Renting a house or apartment, or
  • Living with a relative, spouse or a partner with whom they are living as a couple

Sufficient financial resources, as a result of:

  • A regular salary, or
  • Other professional income (independent commercial activity or through a company), or
  • Sufficient savings (the exact amount required depends on the Monaco banking establishment that is providing the applicant’s reference), or
  • Support from a relative, spouse or partner with whom the applicant is living as a couple

Good character

Monaco ProgramProof of the above should be provided in the form of the applicant’s criminal records information from the country or countries in which they resided for the five years prior to arriving in Monaco.

If your situation differs from those described below, or if you are unable to provide the necessary documents or have genuine reason for not doing so, Privacy Management Group will help you prepare for a consultation with the Residency Section, who will assess your individual situation.

Different Types of Residence Permit

Monaco has three different types of residence permit for foreign nationals over 16 years of age:

  • A “limited” (temporaire) permit can be issued with no minimum requirement for the applicant’s period of residency in Monaco. It is ideal for those applying for residency for the first time.
  • An “ordinary” (ordinaire) permit can be issued for people who have lived in Monaco for three years or more. This type of permit is valid for three years.
  • A “privileged” (privilégié) permit can be issued once the applicant has been resident in Monaco for ten years. It is valid for ten years. The ten-year minimum residency requirement can be reduced to one year in special cases.

Residence for Nationals of the European Economic Area and Third States

This category includes nationals of:

Germany, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Denmark, Spain (including the Balearic and Canary Islands), Estonia, Vatican City, France (Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guyana, Réunion), Finland, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Iceland, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal (including the archipelagos of Madeira and the Azores), Czech Republic, Romania, United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Gibraltar), San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland.

Documents for Proof of Accommodation

  • Rental agreement registered with the Department of Tax Services and/or the applicant’s last electricity bill

If the applicant’s company owns real estate, the applicant must provide:

  • A notarised property deed

If the real estate is owned through an intermediary company, the following is required:

  • The company’s articles of association
  • Proof of the share held by the applicant in the company, or a certificate confirming the applicant’s position within the company

If the applicant is living with someone, two of the following documents are required:

  • Certificate of free accommodation signed by the person with whom they are living (close relative, spouse or partner with whom they are living as a couple)
  • Tenancy agreement, if the applicant is living with someone who rents their home
  • A property deed, if the applicant is living with someone who owns their home

Important: For documents not in French, English or Italian, translations must be supplied.

Documents for Proof of Sufficient Financial Means

Monaco ProgramIn general, applicants will require:

  • A reference from a Monaco bank that proves the applicant has sufficient financial means to be able to live in Monaco (the exact amount required depends on the Monaco banking establishment that is providing the reference)
  • Any other proof that that attests to the fact that the applicant has sufficient financial means to be able to live in Monaco

If the applicant is retired:

  • Proof of pension

If the applicant is an employee in Monaco:

  • A certificate from the Employment Office that approves the applicant’s employment in Monaco. Depending on the applicant’s individual circumstances, this could be: proof of an undertaking of employment, an application for permission to hire, the applicant’s work permit and most recent payslip…

If the applicant is establishing a business in Monaco:

  • A receipt from the Business Development Agency confirming that your application to register a business has been approved

If the applicant is self-employed or the manager or director of a firm:

  • A copy of the relevant entry in the Trade and Industry Register, or
  • For businesses in France, a copy of the relevant KBIS registration entry

Other Documents Required

  • A valid passport and/or ID card
  • Birth certificate
  • Criminal records information from the country or countries in which the applicant resided for the five years prior to moving to Monaco

If the applicant is married:

  • Marriage certificate

If the applicant has children under 16 years of age:

  • A passport and/or ID card for each individual child
  • Proof of custody of minors (where applicable)
  • Adoption certificate (where applicable)
  • Proof of schooling for children educated outside Monaco

If the applicant is separated or divorced:

  • Divorce certificate, or
  • Certificate of legal separation

Book an Appointment with our Service Office

During this appointment, your case file will be checked and registered. You must bring original copies of all documents required. These will be given back to you at the end of the interview.

If your application is approved, your residence permit will be available to collect from the Residents’ Section within a period of 6 weeks.

If the applicant has been living in France for longer than a year:

A transfer of residency must be applied for from the French Embassy in Monaco.

If the applicant has been living in France for less than a year:

A long-stay visa (type D) for Monaco must be applied for from the French Consulate closest to the applicant’s most recent place of residence.

In exceptional cases, foreigners who are already resident in the principality and have suitable accommodation can appeal to the Ministry of Interior for permission to apply directly to the French Embassy in Monaco (Article 5 of the “Convention Franco-Monégasque de voisinage”).

Basic Requirements:

Non-EEA citizens must be in possession of a French visa to be able to apply for a residence permit for Monaco. The following requirements must also be fulfilled:

Documents for Proof of Accommodation

  • Rental agreement registered with the Department of Tax Services and/or the applicant’s last electricity bill.

If the applicant’s company owns real estate, the applicant must provide:

  • A notarised property deed.

If the real estate is owned through an intermediary company, the following is required:

  • The company’s articles of association.
  • Proof of the share held by the applicant in the company, or a certificate confirming the applicant’s position within the company.

If the applicant is living with someone, two of the following documents are required:

  • Certificate of free accommodation signed by the person with whom the applicant is planning to live (close relative, spouse or partner with whom they are living as a couple)
  • Tenancy agreement, if the person rents their home
  • A property deed, if the person owns their home

Important: For documents not in French, English or Italian, translations must be supplied.

Documents for Proof of Sufficient Financial Means

Monaco ProgramIn general, applicants will require:

  • A reference from a Monaco bank that proves the applicant has sufficient financial means to be able to live in Monaco (the exact amount required depends on the Monaco banking establishment that is providing the reference).
  • Any other proof that that attests to the fact that the applicant has sufficient financial means to be able to live in Monaco.

If the applicant is retired:

  • Proof of pension

If the applicant is an employee in Monaco:

  • A certificate from the Employment Office that approves the applicant’s employment in Monaco. Depending on the applicant’s individual circumstances, this could be: proof of an undertaking of employment, an application for permission to hire, the applicant’s work permit and most recent payslip…

If the applicant is establishing a business in Monaco:

  • A receipt from the Business Development Agency confirming that your application to register a business has been approved.

If the applicant is self-employed or the manager or director of a firm:

  • A copy of the relevant entry in the Trade and Industry Register, or
  • For businesses in France, a copy of the relevant KBIS registration entry

Other Documents Required:

  • A valid passport and/or ID card
  • Birth certificate
  • Criminal records information from the country or countries in which the applicant resided for the five years prior to moving to Monaco

If the applicant is married:

  • Marriage certificate

If the applicant has children under 16 years of age:

  • A passport and/or ID card for each individual child
  • Proof of custody of minors (where applicable)
  • Adoption certificate (where applicable)
  • Proof of schooling for children educated outside Monaco

If the applicant is separated or divorced:

  • Divorce certificate, or
  • Certificate of legal separation

Book an Appointment with our Service Office

During this appointment, your case file will be checked and registered. You must bring original copies of all documents required. These will be given back to you at the end of the interview.

If your application is approved, your residence permit will be available to collect from the Residents’ Section within a period of 6 weeks.

Monaco’s advantageous tax law for individuals is one of its best-known attributes. The income tax exemption came about as a result of an order from Prince Charles III in 1869.The only direct tax payable in the principality is tax on the income from industrial and commercial activities. There is no wealth tax, no annual property tax and no municipal tax.

Taxation of Income in Monaco

Monaco ProgramMonegasque citizens and residents in the principality are not required to pay any income tax.

The only exceptions to this are French citizens, who are subject to a bilateral treaty between France and Monaco signed in 1963.

However, the income tax exemption applies only for activities carried out by persons who can prove that they are genuinely resident in the principality.

Taxes on inheritances and gifts apply only for assets that located in or have situs in the Principality of Monaco, irrespective of the domicile, residence and nationality of the deceased or donor (pursuant to the France-Monaco agreement of 1 April 1950).

Taxation on income from savings: An agreement between Monaco and the European Community signed on 7 December 2004 in Brussels contains the same provisions as the European directive 2003/48/CE from 3 June 2003. This agreement is now known as the Savings Directive.

Company Taxation in Monaco

  • Corporate Tax

No corporate tax is levied on companies carrying out industrial and commercial activities and generating more than 25% of their profit outside Monaco.

  • Value Added Tax

VAT is levied on the same basis and at the same rate as in France. The inter-Community tax scheme has applied since 1 January 1993.

As a result of developments in electronic processing, a new teleservice is available for companies subject to VAT. This service is optional and free and makes it possible for VAT to be declared and paid online (including, if applicable, the flat-rate tax on precious metals). Please click here to register for the VAT E-Service.

  • VAT on Real Estate

VAT is chargeable on the supply of real estate to a taxable person acting as such.

  • Customs Regulations

The French and Monegasque territories, including their territorial waters, constitute a customs union as established by the Customs Convention of 18 May 1963. The French Customs Code therefore applies within the Principality of Monaco. On account of its customs union with France, and to ensure that this bilateral agreement is strictly applied, the Principality constitutes part of the European Customs Territory despite remaining a third party state from the perspective of the EU. Goods and services in the Single European Market can therefore be accessed from Monaco.

Other Duties and Taxes in Monaco

  • Registration Fees

Fees for registration formalities are paid either at a proportional rate (normally between 0.5% and 7.5%) or a fixed rate (10€).

  • Other fees and taxes include:
    • Stamp tax (a type of document and registration fee)
    • Tax on the selling and consumption of alcohol
    • Tax on insurance agreements
    • Tax on beverages
    • Tax on precious metals

Duties and taxes on beverages and precious metals in Monaco are subject to the same regulations as in France. They are determined on the same basis and at the same rates.

The general regime, which applies to intra-Community exchanges of products subject to excise duties, has been effective in Monaco since 1 January 1993.

Tax Law and Conditions

Monaco Program Tax LawCertificate of Domicile for Tax Purposes

Certificates of domicile are issued on the basis of Article 7 of the tax treaty signed by France and Monaco on 18 May 1963.

According to the provisions of the treaty, French citizens whose habitual residence was in Monaco for more than five years prior to 13 October 1962 are considered to be domiciled outside France and are subject to Monegasque income tax regulations.

The same applies for:

  • Persons who have been part of or connected with the Princely Family since their date of arrival in the Principality of Monaco.
  • Civil servants, officers or public service employees in Monaco who moved to the principality before 13 October 1962 and adopted it as their usual place of residence.

Children born before 13 October 1957 may be issued with a certificate of domicile. This decision was laid down in correspondence exchanged between the dates of 17 August 1978 and the 23 May 1979, under the condition that they fulfil the following requirements:

  • At least one of their parents must possess a residence certificate.
  • The parent (or at least one of the parents) possessing a residence certificate must have reached the age of majority (21 years) by 13 October 1957. This means that they must have been born on or before 13 October 1936. In the case of children of civil servants, officers, public service employees or those who are part of or connected with the Princely Family, the parent must have reached the age of majority by 13 October 1962 (born on or before 13 October 1941).

Declaration of Usual Residence in the Principality of Monaco

Since 1st January 1986, and following the abolition of the “Head of the Family” concept in French taxation law:

  • The spouse of a French national benefits from “fiscal privilege” on the condition that they have lived in Monaco with their spouse since the date of marriage and that the French national has a certificate of domicile.
  • The same applies for the spouse (male or female) or a Monegasque citizen.
  • The same also applies for French citizens who married a person with a nationality other than French or Monegasque before January 1986 and who moved to Monaco before January 1986.

Dual Nationality

At the present time, a person with dual nationality (French and other non-Monegasque nationalities) who is living in Monaco or moves to Monaco is regarded as being of French nationality for tax purposes.

Payment of Duties

The fixed fee to be paid for the issuance or renewal of a Certificate of Domicile is 12€.

Internationally Renowned Standards of Education

Monaco Edicational SystemChildren are required to attend school from 6 to 16 years of age. Children may begin attending pre-school from 3 years of age.

All state and private schools are recognised as French educational establishments abroad. Teaching plans, curricula and examinations accord with those set out by the French educational authorities. Examinations taken in Monaco are under the aegis of regional educational authorities in Nice.

The language of instruction is French. Some schools have French as a foreign language, which helps non-French-speaking students to integrate more easily.

The school year is 36 weeks long and runs from September to July. It is broken up by four holidays (autumn half term, Christmas, February half term and the Easter holidays).

A Wide Range of Educational Opportunities

Various types of schools exist in the principality to facilitate the fulfilment of the above mentioned requirements:

  • State education is free. There are six state-run kindergartens and primary schools, a collège (secondary school for children aged 11-15 years), a general and technological lycée (for pupils aged 15 to 18) and a vocational academy.
  • Private educational institutions that are subsidised by the Monegasque government (but are run separately from state schools) must fulfil the same requirements as state schools with regard to teaching plans, curricula and examinations. Monaco offers a private primary school and a private establishment encompassing a primary school, collège and lycée.
  • The International School of Monaco offers private education that is not subsidised by the Monegasque government. It is completely independent with regard to its curricula and selection of teachers and offers bilingual teaching (French and English).

High Quality Teaching

Monaco ProgramThe high standards of education in Monaco are reflected in:

  • Small class sizes
  • Sports education is taught by specialist teachers from the beginning of their time in education, and children can learn to swim from the age of five
  • Special emphasis on language learning from an early age: children generally begin learning English from the age of four
  • Numerous options are available throughout the school year to cater to the needs and aptitudes of individual students. There are also a number of international classes available.

What’s Special about Education in Monaco?

A number of aspects of education in Monaco are still unique to the principality:

  • English is taught from the age of four
  • The inclusion of religious studies, which is a component of a number of subjects taught, must be approved by parents
  • Children learn about the history of Monaco
  • The Monegasque language is a core part of the curriculum

How to Enrol Your Child in an Educational Establishment Outside the Principality:

Guidelines and Conditions

If you wish to send your child to an educational establishment outside the principality, you must notify the Ministry of Education in writing. You should send a letter to the Ministry of Education and include the following information:

  • Child’s full name and date of birth
  • Child’s home address
  • Address of the school that your child will attend and details for a point of contact at the school

You should also enclose all documents relevant to the child’s enrolment.

Please be aware that you must notify the Ministry of Education at least eight days to prior to enrolment if you wish for your child to switch schools during the course of the school year.

Annual Payment of Fees

Enrolment fees for establishments outside the principality must be paid annually.

Guidelines and Conditions

Anyone in possession of a Monegasque card or residence permit can register a vehicle in Monaco.

How to Register a Vehicle in MonacoDocuments Required

You must present the following:

  • Your Monegasque driving licence (a copy is sufficient),
  • A valid ID card or a copy of your residence permit,
  • The relevant form, Demande d’immatriculation d’un véhicule, completed and signed,
  • Method of payment (cash or Visa card).

Submitting Your Application

You can submit your file to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office. You do not need to make an appointment. Your registration plates may be collected immediately if the car is not more than four years old or has already undergone its technical inspection.

The registration certificate can be collected later from the same office.

Specifics for Importing Vehicles!

Guidelines and Conditions

Anyone who owns or rents property in Monaco (and has their own name on the deeds or rental contract) may register a vehicle in the principality. This registration must be renewed on an annual basis.

New vehicles from France or Monaco require:

  • Deed of sale,
  • Certificate of conformity (Cerfa).

New vehicles from other European countries require:

Monaco Program

  • Deed of sale or invoice,
  • A European certificate of conformity,
  • Proof that tax on the vehicle has been paid (from the relevant financial authority),
  • A foreign provisional registration certificate (where applicable).

New vehicles from non-EU countries require:

  • Deed of sale or invoice,
  • the 846A customs certificate (Douanes françaises in Monaco),
  • A provisional registration certificate from abroad.

Alongside these documents, you must also provide:

  • A European certificate of conformity*

or

  • A certificate of conformity from the land of origin
  • A certificate of full conformity issued by the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*

or

  • A certificate of conformity from the land of origin
  • A certificate of partial conformity or non-conformity from the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*
  • A completed copy of the form Demande de réception à titre isolé d’un véhicule (385-0016_01-2011) – available at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office

*excluding trailers, commercial vehicles and vehicles over 3.5 tonnes

Used vehicles from Germany

How to Register a Vehicle in Monaco

  • The deed of sale or invoice
  • The foreign registration certificate, which consists of:
    – The registration certificate (Fahrzeugschein) and the deed of ownership
    or
    -The “Teil I” (previously Fahrzeugbrief) and the “Teil II” (previously Fahrzeugschein)
  • Plus proof of the removal of the vehicle from German records by the German authorities:
    – The Fahrzeugbrief should be dated and stamped in the Stilllegung box
    – The Fahrzeugschein should bear the words Fahrzeug Stillgelegt, Stilllegung or Ungültig
    or
    – The “Teil I” should carry the stamp of the issuing town and the Stilllegung box should be ticked
    or
    – A document from the German Consultate confirming the deregistration of the vehicle, or the Abmeldebescheinigung.
  • Proof that the vehicle tax has been paid (from the tax authority)
  • A foreign provisional registration certificate (if required).

Vehicles over 4 years old are subject to a technical inspection that must be carried out in Monaco. The technical inspection certificate is valid for a period of 6 months.

If the registration of the vehicle is expired or no registration authority is available, a provisional “WW” registration can be issued. This can be applied for using the form Demande d’immatriculation provisoire WW MC – WW2 MC (STC024) (385-0020_07-2013).

Used Cars from Other Areas of Europe

  • Deed of sale or invoice
  • Foreign registration certificate
  • Proof that vehicle tax has been paid (from the tax authority)
  • A provisional registration certificate from abroad

Vehicles over 4 years old are subject to a technical inspection that must be carried out in Monaco. The technical inspection certificate is valid for a period of 6 months.

If the registration is expired or no registration authority is available, a provisional “WW” registration can be issued. This can be applied for using the form Demande d’immatriculation provisoire WW MC – WW2 MC (STC024) (385-0020_07-2013).

In addition to the above, you must also provide:

  • A European certificate of conformity or a copy thereof*

or

  • A certificate of full conformity issued by the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*

or

  • A copy of the form Demande de réception à titre isolé d’un véhicule (385-0016_01-2011), which is available from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office
  • A certificate of partial conformity or non-conformity issued by the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*

*excluding trailers, commercial vehicles, vehicles over 3.5 tonnes, vehicles old than 25 years, “X” series competitive vehicles or collectors’ vehicles

Used Cars from Outside the EU

  • Deed of sale or invoice
  • Foreign registration certificate
  • The 846A tax certificate
  • provisional registration certificate from abroad

Vehicles over 4 years old are subject to a technical inspection that must be carried out in Monaco. The technical inspection certificate is valid for a period of 6 months.

If the registration is expired or no registration authority is available, a provisional “WW” registration can be issued. This can be applied for using the form Demande d’immatriculation provisoire WW MC – WW2 MC (STC024) (385-0020_07-2013).

In addition to the above, you must also provide:

  • A European certificate of conformity or a copy thereof*

or

  • A certificate of full conformity issued by the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*

or

  • A certificate of partial conformity or non-conformity issued by the manufacturer or the manufacturer’s representative in France*
  • Form: Demande de réception à titre isolé d’un véhicule (385-0016_01-2011), which, like all other forms required, is available from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office in Monaco

*excluding trailers, commercial vehicles, vehicles over 3.5 tonnes, vehicles old than 25 years, “X” series competitive vehicles or collectors’ vehicles

1. Caisse de Compensation des Services Sociaux (Social Service Compensation Fund)

This is financed by employer contributions and is determined on the basis of the employee’s declared gross salary (within set limits).

It ensures that salaried employees and others covered by the system are provided with health insurance, maternity pay, unemployment pay and life insurance.

Eligible parties (e.g. spouses, dependent children) who are not entitled to join their own insurance scheme and individuals residing in the Principality of Monaco or in France (or in Italy for Monegasque and Italian citizens) are also covered for illness and maternity.

The SSCF provides families with housing allowances, educational grants, special back-to-school grants, payments at the end of the school year, holiday cheques and vouchers for nurseries and after-school clubs.

Monaco